Locations listed are located in Pennsylvania (USA), unless otherwise noted in post.

28 July 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: Thomas McClure


Thomas F. McClure, son of David and Jane McClure died on 30 January 1893. He is buried at the Octorara Presbyterian Cemetery along Valley Road (Route 372) between Quarryville and Christiana, in Southern Lancaster County.

 

Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

27 July 2015

Military Monday: US Daughters of 1812


The other day I visited the Octorara Presbyterian Church down along Route 372/Valley Road between Quarryville and Christiana, Lancaster County. I saw a grave marker I had not seen before. There was an outer circle reading “In honor of service.” Inside the circle is a star reading “N.S. U.S.D. 1812.” Unfortunately the stone had worn and was not readable.  

N.S.U.S.D. stands for National Society of United States Daughters of 1812. The organization was founded 8 January 1892 by Mrs. Flora Adams Darling for the descendents of those who fought for America in the War of 1812. 

Think you might have an ancestor who served in the War of 1812? The NSUSD offers a database of member ancestors. Some entries are more detailed than others.  

Francis Harbison (member # 14849) was born in 1758 in PA. He served PA as a Private in the Chester County Militia. His entry also reveals his wife was Katherine Hart. They had a daughter, Jane, who married James Ewing. Francis died in PA in 1823. 

John Kennedy (member #3442) served Pennsylvania as a Private in the Chester County Dragoons. Others served in a non military fashion. Comstock Passmore (member # 13971) served PA by building a frontier fort! 

Today the organization continues to dedicate itself to patriotism and the preservation of documents and relics. PA has three chapters: Erie, Lancaster and Pittsburgh. The Lancaster Chapter is called the Robert Fulton Chapter. 

 

Military Monday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Toronto scientists isolate insulin


Two scientists at the University of Tornoto – Frederick Banting and Charles Best – successfully isolated insulin On This Day in 1921. They isolated the insulin from canine subjects, created diabetic symptoms in those subjects and then proceeded to administer a program of insulin injection which returned the subjects to their pre-diabetic state! 

Almost 10% of the American population has diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Although scientists like Banting and Best have made great strides, diabetes is still the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. 

Source:
Insulin isolated in Toronto  History.com On This Day in History, 1921 

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

26 July 2015

Sunday’s Obituary: Christian Mellinger

Christian Mellinger was in his 92nd year of life when he died on 25 July 1880. A resident of Mountville in Lancaster County, he was a farmer. A member of the Old Mennonite Church, he was survived by four sons and six daughters. 

His obituary reads:

Christian Mellinger, a venerable patriarch of Mountville, West Hempfield township, died last evening between 10 and 11 o’clock, in the 92nd year of his age, of dropsy, with which he had been but a short time affected. Mr. Mellinger was a native of this county, a farmer by profession, and led a quiet and homely life; and yet by his frugality, industry and skill in farming acquired a very considerable fortune, estimated at from $80,000 to $100,00. He was an upright, honorable man, highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a widower, and for some years past has lived with one of his sons. He was a member, we believe, of the Old Mennonite church. His surviving family consists of four sons and six daughters, all of whom are married. His funeral will take place on Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock. 

Source:
Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 26 July 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

Sunday’s Obituary is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Robert Fulton honored


The Union Fire Company, On This Day in 1880, commemorated the birthday of Robert Fulton, who was a member of that company.

The Union Fire Company was founded in 1742 and is the oldest continuing operating volunteer fire company in the nation. Many influential Lancastrians were members at one time or another.  

Source:
Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 26 July 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

25 July 2015

On This Day: Two young coal pickers killed


Two young coal pickers were killed On This Day in 1881 in Ashley. Edith and Lottie Low, 10 and 12 years of age, were killed as they were picking coal from the tracks. Edith was struck and killed by a passenger train. Lottie was struck as well. Her injuries were so severe that there was little to no hope of her survival. The train was on the Central R. R. of New Jersey. 

Source:

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 25 July 1881. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

24 July 2015

Follow Friday

Several articles caught my attention this week but these stood out:

I used to think I was alone in that my Dad’s grandparents and families all listed different places of birth on various papers over the years. This week, Find Lost Russian & Ukrainian Family faced a similar dilemma in her post “Whysome documents will never tell the full truth.” Vera Miller’s family came over much later than mine but many people of Slavic origins have recounted the same dilemma to me over the years. Will we ever actually know where our family came from and why they “lied?” 

Heather Wilkinson Rojo, of Nutfield Genealogy, inspired Karen Krantzberg, of The Road Backward, to write “Mytop five genealogy books.”  What a great idea and a neat way to share resources! I think I may work on that in the upcoming days. 

I love old postcards. New ones too. Simon Last, earlier this week, wrote a post on Charwood Genealogy about old postcard research. Some of the information provided within those little cards is amazing! You can read his post by clicking here. 

Resource Finds:
I thought I would also pass along some resources I tracked down this week through various sources. 

The U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, is now available on Ancestry.com.  

Many Roads lists many Prussian/German resources. Click here to go there. 

Final Note:
Set your tv to record Sunday as the season premier of “Who Do You Think You Are” begins back up at 9/8C. Tweet your thoughts on the show using the hashtag #WDYTYA. 

Follow Me:
I’d like to close by inviting YOU to follow me:

 


Follow Friday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Fire destroys Lititz mill


An early morning fire destroyed a flour and grain mill just east of Lititz On This Day in 1885. A young man discovered the fire on his way home. At first he thought the millers were working late but then realized it was in fact on fire. He sounded the alarm but the mill was totally destroyed.

The mill was owned by Abraham Huber of Manheim Township and operated by his nephew, John Huber.

Source:

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 24 July 1885. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

23 July 2015

TBT & a Those Places Thursday preview at the Octoraro Lake


Throwback Thursday (TBT) - Our wedding day
From left to right: my sister Noreen, me (obviously, right!), hubby Glenn, and his best friend/best man Rick Wilkey.

Those Places Thursday preview ...
the photo was taken at the Octoraro Lake in Southern Lancaster County ... which will be the feature of next week's Those Places Thursday!

 
Those Places Thursday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015


On This Day: Eckman charged with forgery

James A. Eckman, of Drumore Centre, the hotel that burned on the 21st, was arrested for forgery On This Day in 1880. Eckman allegedly had given a note to L. Strauss & Co. of Philadelphia but he had signed it G.W. Harbeson.

Harbeson naturally denied any knowledge of the note. Eckman was given bail for $500 and would go before Squire Groff in Willow Street on the 27th of July. Eckman claimed Harbeson had given him permission to sign his name. 

The Drumore Centre Hotel had burned completely on the 21st July 1880. The hotel, according to the article, had just been advertised at sheriff’s sale before the fire.

James is the son of the late Henry Eckman.  

Source:

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 23 July 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

22 July 2015

On This Day: Hotel burns


The Southern End hotel, known as Drumore Centre, has burned. The origin of the fire, which occurred approximately 6 p.m. on the 21st July 1880, was unknown. Neighbors were able to save the contents of the house and protect the surrounding buildings. 

The license for the hotel was still in court pending. The title of the property is held by the son of the late Henry Eckman. The son (unnamed in the article) and his mother, Henry’s widow, lived there for years. A Mr. Sanders McCullough from nearby Oxford held a lien on the property. The lien is assumed (by the article) to be greater than the insurance. The hotel was insured by the Southern Mutual of Lancaster County for $2,000. 

The hotel is described as a two story frame structure. It was located at the Lancaster and Port Deposit Road crossroads. It was located near the Washington Lodge A.Y.M. 

Source:

Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 22 July 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

21 July 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: William & Elizabeth Kunkle

William and Elizabeth Kunkle are buried together in the old German Reformed Church Cemetery on Sawmill Road in Strasburg Township.

The cemetery which is full of Eckmans and of course these Kunkles, is situated on what is now private property. However it is along the roadside and the family there maintains it for the most part. My girls and I stopped by recently and took this photo then.

 

Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Jaw bones found in house


Jaw bones were found On This Day in 1880 in the Muhlenberg house on South Queen Street. The bones were found sealed up between the floor and ceiling at the first landing of the stairs and had evidently been placed their when the house was built at the beginning of the century.

The house was originally built by Joseph Montgomery. For many years thereafter it was the home of Dr. F. A. Muhlenberg. It was recently purchased by Isaac Diller. 

The bones are those of either a horse or mule. They were found while men were making alterations to the stairway. 

Source:
 
Lancaster Daily Intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 21 July 1880. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015