Locations listed are located in Pennsylvania (USA), unless otherwise noted in post.

06 July 2015

Happy birthday, Dad

Today would have been Dad's (Frank Raymond Eckman) birthday. He was born On This Day in 1929 to John Charles Eckman and Mabel Florence Eckman. He lived in Philadelphia until he, his wife and son (Glenn - the other three were already out on their own) moved to Kirkwood, Lancaster County in 1975.

This photo was taken at our (mine and Glenn obviously) wedding in 1992.

Dad passed on 16 January 1994, at the age of 64.

On This Day: US Naval Academy opens its doors to women

It was On This Day in 1976 that the US Naval Academy opened its door to women for the first time since it opened in 1845. Eighty-one female midshipmen were inducted into the Academy in Annapolis, MD.

The first female to graduate from that class would be Elizabeth Anne Rowe, in May 1980. 

Source:
History.com. 6 July 1976 

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
               
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

05 July 2015

On This Day: Nation prays for her president

The nation prayed for her president On This Day in 1881. Just three days prior, President James A. Garfield was shot by Charles Guiteau at the Baltimore & Potomac depot. He would die 11 weeks later, just four months after taking office, on 19 September 1881.

Despite the President still holding on, Guiteau is already referred to as the “assassin.” 
 
Telegrams and notes of sympathies poured into the White House from across the nation and the world. 
 

Source:
Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 5 July 1801. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

Photo:
"Garfield assassination engraving cropped" by A. Berghaus and C. Upham, published in Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. - Image obtained from the Images of American Political History  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

04 July 2015

On This Day: Declaration of Independence is adopted

It was On This Day in 1776 that our Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia. This declaration basically announced the independence of our young nation from Great Britain. It denounced the King. Essentially, this document united the colonies against Britain and her rules.



It was not until 1783 however, upon the signing of the Treaty of Paris with Britain, that the United States of America truly became our own free and independent nation.

Sources:
Declaration of Independence. Archives.gov. 

This Day in History.  History.com. 4 July 1776.
 

 
On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

02 July 2015

On This Day: A killer heat wave

A killer heat wave is to blame for 97 people in New York in just 24 hours. It was On This Day in 1800 that the Lancaster Daily Intelligencer reported that 97 of the reported 187 deaths in New York yesterday alone were the result of the heat.


Source:

Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 2 July 1800. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

30 June 2015

Tombstone Tuesday: The Williamson Boys

W. Henry Williamson and Lt. Samuel Williamson, Civil War soldiers, are buried together in the Cheyney Burial Grounds. The cemetery is located in Thornbury Township, Chester County. The Cheyney land, including the university that now stands there, crosses both Delaware and Chester Counties. 

William Henry enlisted in the Co. D 124th Regt. Pennsylvania Infantry. He was, according to his stone, just 19 when he died at the Stafford Court House in Virginia on 3 February 1863. He was also known as William Henry and William Harry, according to the National Park Service (NPS), which lists his rank as musician. 

Samuel was a lieutenant with Co. D 5th Pennsylvania Calvary (65th Volunteers). He was, according to his stone, just 20 when he was killed on 7 February 1863 in an engagement in Williamsburg, Virginia.  

Samuel enlisted as a Sergeant on 30 July 1861. He was promoted up to Full 2nd Lieutenant on 26 January 1862 and to Full 1st Lieutenant on 1 January 1863, according to the History of Pennsylvania Volunteers. According to the NPS, that regiment lost only one officer and 76 enlisted men killed. Another 216 died from disease over the four years of service. The History of Pennsylvania Volunteers states Samuel mustered on in Williamsburg, Virginia on 15 January 1863 and that he did not survive the war. (I mention this only because the date conflicts with the death date on his tombstone.) 

The boys were brothers. Their parents are William Williamson and Miranda Cheyney, daughter of Waldon Cheyney and Martha Scott. 



Tombstone Tuesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: German boats burn at New Jersey docks


Four German boats burned at the docks in Hoboken, NJ On This Day in 1900. Over 300 people were killed in the incident. The fire could be seen by all in the New York City area.

The four ships were the Saale, the Bremen, the Kaiser Wilhelm der Grosse, and the Main. The Saale was the first to go down. Many of her crew drowned, not knowing how to swim. The fire spread to 27 ships in all, the shore and local businesses.

The wooden pier was rebuilt using steel. 

Source:
This Day in History.  History.com. 30 June 1900.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

29 June 2015

On This Day: Germans take Lvov

The Germans invaded and occupied Lvov On This Day in 1941. Lvov is located in eastern Galicia, in Ukraine.


Source:

This Day in History.  History.com. 29 June 1941.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

28 June 2015

Sunday’s Obituary: Dr Jonathan Deyo


Dr. Jonathan Deyo, born March 1846, was a physician for many years. Although he was married, he and Emma never had any children. They were married in 1878, according to the dates provided in the 1900 US Census. According to the Directory of Deceased American Physicians, 1804-1929, he died of heart disease. 

His obituary reads:
Dr. Jonathan Titus Deyo, seventy-five, of No. 821 Beverly Road, Brooklyn, died suddenly last night in front of No. 521 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, while on his way to a patient in South Brooklyn. Mrs. Deyo said Dr. Deyo was not well last night but the call was from an old patient and he felt he must respond. Dr. Deyo was born in Ulster County, New York. He practiced in Manhattan for about thirty years before going to Brooklyn twenty-five years ago. 

Source:
The evening world. (New York, NY), 28 Oct. 1921. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

Year: 1900; Census Place: Brooklyn Ward 22, Kings, New York; Roll: 1059; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 0363; FHL microfilm: 1241059 

 

Sunday’s Obituary is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

On This Day: Confederates capture ships

It was On This Day in 1862 that the Confederates captured the St. Nicholas on the Chesapeake Bay. The plan, laid out by George Hollins and Richard Thomas Zarvona, was to take the St. Nicholas and use her to marshal other Union ships. 

Zarvona recruited a band of pirates who boarded the St. Nicholas as passengers. Hollins boarded separately. They surprised the crew and took the ship. Their original plan was to then take the Pawnee, a Union gunboat, but it had been called away. Instead the took three commercial ships. 

Source:

This Day in History.  History.com. 28 June 1862.  



On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

27 June 2015

Surname Saturday: Deyo family murdered


I knew the Deyo clan was rather large before we even went to New Paltz earlier this week. My husband, ironically, seemed surprised at how vast the Deyo/Deyoe family is and what an impact they had – and continue to have – on the community there. Today, I too was surprised by the Deyo clan.

Skimming through Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers, I came across an article, dated 26 August 1908, about one group of Deyos. The headline reads: Fugitive Who Attacked Deyo Family Up the State Trapped at Greenwood Lake. The dateline is Middletown, NY. 

The article states:
“Weak from loss of blood and in a starving condition “Bill” Monroe, the desperado who murderously assaulted six members of the Deyo family and burned a barn at New Paltz on Friday afternoon, was trapped at Greenwood Lake to-day.” 

Monroe himself was in a weak condition and bleeding from pistol wounds. A family finally let him in and summoned the physician who examined him. Monroe had stated that he had been traveling from Campgaw, NJ to Greenwood Lake but could travel no more. News was sent to Goshen where it reached Sheriff A. L. Decker, Sheriff F. T. Hock and Chauffer Strach. The three started out to Greenwood Lake 

The article also states:
Monroe had been hunted by armed men and deputy sheriffs since the day of the attack.” 

Monroe escaped capture until November the following year.  

An article, dated 26 November 1909, in The Citizen (out of Honesdale, PA), provides some insight.  

The murders occurred on 11 August 1908 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Abram Deyo. Abram was a farmer near New Paltz in Ulster County, NY. In addition to Mr. and Mrs. Abram Deyo, the others at home that fateful day was their infant son, Mrs. Jonathan Deyo and a servant. While Jonathan was not in the home at the time, he is described as a New York Lawyer. Mrs. Jonathan Deyo is also referred to as Abram’s sister-in-law. 

Monroe asked Deyo for work and when Deyo, knowing Monroe’s reputation, refused, Monroe became angered. Monroe assaulted the six in the house then headed for the barn, where Jonathan was overseeing the men working. Monroe assaulted Jonathan and burned the barn. 

So now, I am curious … Why were they murdered? Who was Monroe to them? 

Sources:
The citizen. (Honesdale, Pa.), 26 Nov. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87078082/1909-11-26/ed-1/seq-8/> 

The evening world. (New York, N.Y.), 26 Aug. 1908. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83030193/1908-08-26/ed-1/seq-9/>

CORRECTION
I erred in this post. I assumed (yes, I know) "murderously assaulted" actually meant murdered. I will write an update to this odd situation but for now, please forgive my assumption. ~ Jeanne, Sunday, 28 June 2015.

 

Surname Saturday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers. 
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman

On This Day: Mob kills Mormon leader

It was On This Day in 1844 that an Anti-Mormon mob murdered Joseph Smith and his brother Hyrum in Carthage, IL.

Smith, born in 1805, was the founder of the Mormon religion. The religion, also known as the Church of Latter Day Saints, was criticized for some of its practices – such as polygamy. Having settled in Nauvoo, IL, Smith had announced his candidacy for president of the United States earlier in 1844.

It was two years later that Brigham Young, Smith’s successor, led the Mormons out of Nauvoo into the Valley of the Salt Lake, where the Church is headquartered today.

Source:
This Day in History.  History.com. 27 June 1844.



On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.              

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015

26 June 2015

On This Day: Intelligencer founder moves on

 
Captain Alfred Sanderson, one of the founders of the Daily Intelligencer, has moved on, according to the Daily Intelligencer On This Day in 1882. Sanderson is now at the Philadelphia Press.

Source:

Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, PA), 26 June 1882. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Library of Congress.  

 

On This Day is a prompt to further explore historical events.
                
© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015