22 December 2014

Survivors found after 10 weeks in the Andes


I was only three years old when the plane crashed in the Argentine Andes. I do not obviously recall the actual news of the crash but, as a teen, I read “Alive!” by Piers Paul Read. The book moved me. Something about this incredible story of survival and desperation simply moved me.

It was On This Day – 22 December – in 1972, that the Chilean Air Force found 14 survivors of the crash. They had been up in the mountains for more than two months.

It had taken 10 days for Roberto Canessa and Fernando "Nando" Parrado to traverse down the mountain and find civilization and ultimately help for themselves and the others still on the mountain. They first saw a Chilean arriero - Sergio Catalán. The next day (22nd) the Chilean Air Force found the remaining survivors.

Originally the plane carried 45 passengers. The plane carried a Catholic Uruguayan rugby team, their family and friends. The plane crashed on Friday, 13 October.
 
Photo:
Public Domain photo. Parrado and Canessa (sitting) with Chilean arriero Sergio Catalán who they first saw when they came off the mountain.
 
 
On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.
 

Matrilineal Monday: Mary Kirchner Janson

Mary Anna Kirchner was my husband’s great grandmother’s sister. She was born 29 June 1851 in Lancaster to John and Barbara Kuhn Kirchner. I chose her to write about for today’s Matrilineal Monday because it was today – 22 December – in 1913 when she passed away.

I know so very little about Mary. Being a daughter of John and Barbara Kuhn Kirchner, I could easily assume she had been baptized at St. Joseph RC Church in Lancaster. The rest of the family was so this would make sense.

She married Charles William Janson in 1886. I do not know how the two met or where they married.
 
He was a collector. The Janson Family shows up on both the 1900 and the 1910 Census as living in Baltimore, Maryland.

They had 10 children: Cecilia, Rolendis, Henry, Margaret, Anna, Roman Philip, Jerome A., Gertrude C., Dorothy May, Charles M., and one who passed before 1900. The first five (Cecilia, Rolendis, Henry, Margaret, and Anna) were from Charles’ first marriage.

She died on 22 December 1913 in Baltimore.

 

Matrilineal Monday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

21 December 2014

Snow White premiered today

On This Day - 21 December - in 1937 the world's first full length animated movie debuted. It was Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

 
On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.

Sunday's Obituary: Lisa Gill

I have always clipped this that and the other news bit from the local papers. December of 1991, I saw in the paper (looks to be from the now-defunct Village News or Parkesburg Post) the obituary of a high school classmate. I believe she – Lisa Gill – was the first of our class (Class of 1987) to pass since graduation.

Her obituary reads:
Lisa M. Gill, 23, of 5 E. Bridge St., Parkesburg, died unexpectedly on Thursday, Dec. 19 in Lancaster General Hospital.

Born in West Chester, she was the daughter of John L. and Janice Adams Gill of Parkesburg. She had lived most of her life in Parkesburg and was graduated from Octorara High School, Class of 1987.

Miss. Gill was presently serving her internship at the Lancaster General Hospital, and would have graduated from Millersville University in July as a medical technician.

She was of the Catholic faith. While in high school, she had been a member of the National Honor Society.

Besides her parents, she is survived by two brothers, John L. Gill and Joshua L. Gill, both at home, paternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John M. Gill, of Coatesville; and maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Adams, of Parkesburg.
 
 
Sunday's Obituary is a daily genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
 

20 December 2014

Historical Society closes for holiday

The Lancaster County Historical Society has announced that it will be closed to the public from 31 December through 10 January. The staff will use this time to prepare for the coming year. The Society will reopen on Monday, 12 January.

The Regional History Colloquiums will begin again on 22 January. Richard Hertzler will present My Lancaster County through Photographs at 4 p.m. that Thursday. The following Thursday, the 29th, Bill Rothermal will present The Shutte Car Company: Custom Cars in Lancaster. All Colloquiums are free to the public.

The Historical Society, known also as LancasterHistory.org, is located at 230 N. President Avenue.



Society Saturday is a genealogical prompt of the GeneaBloggers.

Keating sworn in as Australia’s Prime Minister

Paul Keating was sworn in as the 24th Prime Minister of Australia On This Day (20 December) in 1991. He defeated Bob Hawke. He served as Prime Minister until 1996, when he was defeated by John Howard.

Keating is the son of Matthew and Minnie Keating. He was born in 1944 near Sydney. In 1975 he married Annita van Iersel. They had four children before separating in November of 1998. They officially divorced in 2008.

A personal note:
I remember reading (here in the American media) when Keating was sworn in as PM. I was so excited to finally see another Keating in the news ... and then I saw he was in Australia. My Keating line is from Ireland. I did not realize/know until that time (1991) that many convicts went to Australia. There were many who simply chose to settle there as well. In fact, while America may have a higher number of Irish descendants, Australia has a higher percentage of Irish descendants!  
 
Australian Research:
The Museum Victoria offers a brief history of the Irish immigration to Australia.
A site, called CoraWeb, offers more immigration information including ships index.
Immigration and work permit information is available at workpermit.com.
 
On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.
 
Happy hunting ... and if have a Keating up your tree, please feel free to drop me a line!

19 December 2014

Palatines arrive in Philadelphia

On This Day (19 December) in 1798 the Columbia docked in Philadelphia. This is according to a list titled Palatine German Immigrant Ships to Philadelphia 1796-1808 on RootsWeb. For more information on Palatine Germans and their immigration to America, visit Palatines to America online at https://www.palam.org/ 

 
On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.


#FF More Tweets

Next year – 2015 – one of my goals is to be more active with Twitter. Since Twitter limits characters to 140, I will have to work on some more teasers, for lack of a better word. These posts will off course link back here, to Genealogical Gems.

My most recent follows are:
  1. Genchat (Jen) tweeting at @genchat
  2. @AccessGenealogy
  3. Leslie Lawson tweeting at @llawson3967
  4. PA-Roots tweeting at @paroots
  5. Martin James tweeting at @heritagefamily
One final note: be sure to follow me at @GenealogicalGem.
 
 
Follow Friday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

 

18 December 2014

Last of the Molly Maquires executed

John Kehoe, the last of the Molly Maquires, was executed today in 1878 in Pennsylvania. The Molly Maquires were advocates for the Irish American people, often focusing on their work and living conditions in coal towns in Pennsylvania.

Must Reads:
1878: John Kehoe, ling and last of Molly Maquires
http://www.executedtoday.com/2008/12/18/1878-john-kehoe-king-and-last-of-the-molly-maguires/

Molly Maquires in Pennsylvania Coal Regions
http://www.historynet.com/molly-macguires-in-pennsylvania-coal-regions.htm

A closer look at Hiram Cory

Hiram Cory lived in Concord Township in 1859. He owned a tract of land where the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad would, two years later, intersect with the Sunbury and Erie Railroad.

Amos Harrington sold 63 acres to Hiram in 1858, according to the Corry Area Chamber of Commerce. Hiram built his home on West Washington Street. Hiram and Harrington however were not the first settlers. That distinction goes to Michael and Elizabeth Hare. The Hares built a cabin on the banks of a creek in 1795. That creek is now called Hare Creek.

Hiram was assessed at 144, according to the Financial Assessment of Erie County and General Business Directory 1859-1860. There was one other Cory included in the assessment. He was Henry and he was assessed at 25.

On 27 May 1861, the railroads came to cross. Cory sold a portion of his land to the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad for this venture to work. The Railroad in turn built a ticket office and named it after him, though they spelled it incorrectly. The name Corry stuck and that is how the town got its name.

In 1863 the town became a borough. In 1866 it officially became a city. But what of Hiram? None of the histories available online mention him after he sells some of his land and the town receives its name. In fact, all the histories read almost verbatim! So what happened to Hiram? Has the town forgotten its founder?

A quick Google search led to Ancestry.com where Hiram Cory is found listed as the son of James (1794-1846) and Rebecca Sperry (1800-1976) Cory. Hiram was born in 1834 making him just 24 years old when he became the town’s namesake. He married Mary Ann Rine (1834-1906) and fathered six children with her. Their children are: Carey, Orissa, Marie (1869-1892), Elizabeth, Oscar (1866-1957), and Russel Rine (b. 1872). He and Mary Ann are buried in the Old Baptist Cemetery in Frankfort, Ross County, Ohio.

However that whole line, according to Find A Grave, which quotes a text called The Cory Family, shows the family all in Ohio. Births, deaths, burials – everything happened in Fayette or Ross Counties, Ohio. According to Find A Grave, Hiram and Mary Ann married on 2 November 1859 in Ross County, Ohio.

Find A Grave does list one other Hiram Cory. That Hiram (1820-1887) was the son of James and Poly Rice Cory. He married Fanny Spencer (1820-1887), They show up on the 1860 Census in Pinckney, Lewis County, NY with three children: Sedate, Sandusky, and Ashley. Hiram and Fanny are buried at the Huron Evergreen Cemetery in Huron, Wayne County, NY.

This last entry would put Hiram at 38 years of age when he bought that land from Harrington. This, in my opinion, seems more plausible than a 24 year old affording 63 acres.

Hiram remains a mystery. On that note, I am sending off an email to the Erie County Historical Society to see if they have information on what became of Corry’s namesake.
                                                   

Sources:
Ancestry.com. Hiram S Cory. http://records.ancestry.com/hiram_s_cory_records.ashx?pid=111273795.

Ancestry.com. U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.

"Corry History” Corry Area Chamber of Commerce. http://www.corrychamber.com/the-chamber/history/. Last accessed online 18 December 2014.


Those Places Thursday: Corry PA

Corry is a small town in northwestern Pennsylvania that roughly 6,400 people call home. It is located about 30 miles southeast of Erie. 

The town was named for Hiram Cory. The Atlantic and Great Western Railroad intersected with the Sunbury and Erie Railroad on 27 May 1861. The land where those two railroads intersected was owned by Cory. He has sold a portion of his land to the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad and the railroad then built a ticket office there naming it for him. However a spelling error caused the town to be named Corry instead. 

The railroad saw the growth of many small towns and cities across America, and Corry was no different. 

The town became a borough in 1863 and later, in 1866, was deemed a city. Industry drove the growth of the city, which became famous for the manufacturing of Climax locomotives In fact, manufacturing still accounts for approximately 30% of the industries in Corry.
The postcard pictured here is dated 26 July 1911. It is addressed to a Mr. Harry Kurtz of Narvon, Lancaster County. Honey Brook was originally written and was crossed out. Honey Brook is across the county line from Narvon and is located in Chester County.


Those Places Thursday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

17 December 2014

Wordless Wednesday: Panko Hruszczak

 
Certificate of Citizenship
for Panko Hruszczak
my great grandfather
 
Wordless Wednesday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.
 

Grant ordered Jews out of his military district

It was this day in 1862 that Major-General Ulysses S. Grant issued his controversial General Order No. 11. It was this order that called for the expulsion of Jews in Tennessee, Mississippi and Kentucky. That is, he ordered the Jewish people to vacate his military district.  

“The Jews, as a class violating every regulation of trade established by the Treasury Department and also department orders, are hereby expelled from the department within twenty-four hours from the receipt of this order,” read the Order. 

Word of the Order traveled slow. Cesar Kaskel, a Jewish gentleman from Paducah, KY, made haste to Washington and pleaded personally to President Abraham Lincoln. When Lincoln learned of this Order, he immediately ordered it repealed.

 

On This Day is a prompt I started this month to further explore historical events. I will make every effort to keep events localized to that of my research or research I am conducting for others. However, from time to time, it will simply be a subject that captured my attention.
Some posts will be brief while others may be more detailed.