13 February 2015

Follow Friday includes insane asylums, tb, and graves this week

Can’t find someone in the census or voting lists? Try the insane asylums! “Everything Qualified You for Admission to an Insane Asylum 125 Years Ago” reviews some of the almost-hilarious reasons why someone could be admitted.  The example provided in the article by Michael Palumbo lists “Reasons for Admissions 1864 to 1889.” Some of those reasons include: imaginary female trouble, masturbation for 30 years, nymphomania, dropsy, time of life, and grief.” Epileptic fits were also on the lists. I have an aunt who was admitted for this last reason. The article appears on RYOT.
 

Blog posts worth reading:

  • Gail Dever, of Genealogy a la carte, posted “The Forgotten Plague focuses on deadliest killer in human history, tuberculosis” this week. It was actually a preview article for a PBS showing that aired Tuesday, 10 February. There is a preview video within her post.
  • Death is something we all most likely chat about daily, or at least weekly, being genealogists. A Grave Interest wrote a great piece this week about how funerals have changed since 1915. The piece is well written and a real eye opener!
  • Lacey Holley pays a great tribute to her best friend in “Tombstone Tuesday: Lois Hawely.” A sweet reminder that we should all take time to appreciate the ones we have and to vocalize that appreciation. 

My New Follows at Twitter:


  • @OakAncestry – Exploring your Irish roots? Check them out!
  • @Nurph – a Twitter chat platform
  • @Geneosity – an online resource for family historians
  • @irishlivewire – Irish Genealogical Research Society    

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Helpful websites

  • Ukraine is a country rich in history. It is intertwined with the histories of Poland, Galicia and Russia. “The History behind the Regional Conflict in Ukraine” by John-Paul Himka tracks the history on academia.edu. 

 
 

Follow Friday is a genealogical prompt of GeneaBloggers.

                

© Jeanne Ruczhak-Eckman, 2015
Locations listed are located in Pennsylvania (USA), unless otherwise noted in post.